Lisa Kane

Lisa Kane

Lisa Kane profile picture

Hi there,

Thanks for visiting.

Like many women I’ve got a few time-consuming roles: writer, mother, advisor, streets-enthusiast and then lots of just-as-important-ones (wife, friend, mentor, daughter….) In my work and research I’m particularly interested in the connection between human values and human rights, energy and streets. I hanker for and try and work towards more humanity in transport planning practices. I’m multi-disciplined. I started off as an engineer, shifted into transport planning and I’ve just completed my PhD thesis in ‘Science and Technology Studies’. People say my good points are that I’m curious, bright, open-minded and naturally receptive to abstract ideas and seeing connections that others don’t see. (My main failing is with anything administrative).
I’ve worked on fascinating projects with great people since I came to South Africa in 1996. I was proud to be connected with the setting up of the Centre for Transport Studies at the University of Cape Town (UCT) and the Transport Studies Programme there. I continue my association with the UCT as an Honorary Research Associate. I’ve worked on a few low-carbon transport projects for Sustainable Energy Africa, including the low carbon strategy for central Cape Town, with the Cape Town Partnership.  I was part of a World Wildlife Fund reference group looking at low-carbon strategies for transport in South Africa. I am proud to have helped found Open Streets Cape Town. Most recently I’ve been involved as an advisor with  the Development Mitigation Forum workstream of the MAPS project based at the Energy Research Centre of UCT. So, I have thumbs in a few pies, but they are all interconnected  in some way to my streets-low carbon transport-people fascination. (From time to time I tweet on this kind of thing and you can follow me @LisaKaneZa). I finished my PhD thesis in 2015 at the Open University and I’m working at converting it into a book. This draws inspiration from the work of my supervisor John Law, in thinking about the “unfinished” Foreshore Freeways in Cape Town, and asks “how do roads get to be the way they are?”
Happy reading.